Archive for the ‘Footbridge Project’ Category

IROPENO FOOTBRIDGE   Leave a comment

First phase of a footbridge at Iropeno in Enga Province is now complete. The construction of the footbridge is funded by the Enga Provincial Government and implemented by ATprojects Inc. ATprojects’ engineer Nagasi Namui said the footbridge is being constructed across the Maramuni River which separates the Penali and Kururamba villages. Mr Namui said the first phase of the footbridge involved gathering sand and stones, transportation of materials to the bridge sites on both sides of the river and construction of footings (see picture) on both sides. He said the second phase which is the final stage will be carried out soon.

Bob Abio, ATprojects Technical Officer who flew into this remote area in the Kompiam District said the completion of the footbridge will immensely help the locals who cross the river on a regular basis. Mr Abio further added that in the past the villagers have been using make-shift canes to cross the river which is very risky during the wet season. He said the footbridge will benefit hundreds of locals, especially the Penali villagers who cross the river to get to the nearest aid post which is a day’s walk. A community leader in the area, Lenas Kaupa said service delivery in his LLG is very minimal and was happy that the Enga Provincial Government was able to fund the project.

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Posted October 14, 2015 by atprojectsblogs in Footbridge Project

USIOTO FOOTBRIDGE PROJECT TO BENEFIT LOCALS   Leave a comment

Difficulty crossing the Mapemo River during the rainy season might soon be a thing of the past for the Gimiufa and Gimisave people in the Ward 4 LLG of Daulo in Eastern Highlands Province.

For many years people living along the Mapemo River and school students have been facing problems trying to cross the river during the rainy season.

ATprojects with the help of its technical staff has started consultation with the locals and are in the process of writing a report to seek funding from the Eastern Highlands Provincial Government and Open Members of Daulo and Goroka Districts to construct the footbridge.

During this week’s consultation by the ATprojects Co-Director Mrs. Miriam Layton and Engineer Mr. Nagasi Namui many people from Gimiufa and the neighboring villages have expressed same sentiments of loosing houses, gardens, livestock and even people to floods.

ATprojects Co-Director Miriam Layton speaks to the locals during the consultation trip at the proposed footbridge site.

ATprojects Co-Director Miriam Layton speaks to the locals during the consultation trip at the proposed footbridge site.

According to a spokesperson from Gimiufa, Putete Nipiapu over the years whenever there was a flood the villagers used to cut huge trees to get to the other side of the river bank.

Mr Nupiapu said their efforts to maintain the makeshift bridges had been in vain as when there is heavy rain it use to wash away the logs leaving no option for the villagers but to look for another location again to cut a tree in order to cross the river and the river is also constantly changing its course every rainy season.

“Whenever we put huge logs across the river it gets washed away by huge flood during the rainy season,” Mr Nupiapu said.

ATprojects Engineer Nagasi Namui measures the span of the Usioto footbridge in Daulo District.

ATprojects Engineer Nagasi Namui measures the span of the Usioto footbridge in Daulo District.

He said after a number of discussions with his fellow villagers, they have selected an ideal location to build a footbridge at Usioto.

John Luvi another villager from the area said since the Asaroka Lutheran Secondary, Primary, Elementary school, Lutheran Mission and an aid post are all situated on the other side of the river bank with more than 1,000 people from throughout the Daulo district especially parents.

He said the footbridge will help many people especially mothers who often find it difficult to sell their garden food in the market during the rainy season.

Posted February 6, 2015 by atprojectsblogs in Footbridge Project

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PREPARATIONS FOR FOOTBRIDGES CONSTRUCTION   Leave a comment

After shifting the cement into smaller sized carrier bags, ATprojects Project Manager Henao Longgar is seen counting the 'cement' bags that will be travelling

After shifting the cement into smaller sized carrier bags, ATprojects Project Manager Henao Longgar is seen counting the ‘cement’ bags that will be travelling

Preparation for this year’s footbridge project in the Yelia LLG of Obura Wonenara district took a lot of planning and yes, calculations  – why? Because ATprojects knew that to carry a full cement bag and heavy construction materials to the construction sites would be alot of work, taking in consideration the weight limitations on small aircrafts which operate some of these rural stations.

Atprojects Engineer, Nagasi Namui and Bob Abio Atprojects Welder/ Electrician preparing the hand rail support post for the bridge

Atprojects Engineer, Nagasi Namui and Bob Abio Atprojects Welder/ Electrician preparing the hand rail support post for the bridge

You can see from the pictures some of the preparations ATprojects staff undertook to make the transition of materials travelling to the construction site easier.

Cement  bags being loaded  onto the truck at the Atprojects centre,ready to be transported to the airport and then to Simbari via plane.

Cement bags being loaded onto the truck at the Atprojects centre,ready to be transported to the airport and then to Simbari via plane.

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CARING FOR FOOTBRIDGES   Leave a comment

CARE PNG annual reflection & planning meetingThe footbridge project in the Obura Wonenara district, Eastern Highlands Province is by far the biggest project funded by CARE PNG in this district.

This was made known during an ‘Annual Reflection and Planning Meeting’
of CARE PNG at the Pacific Garden Hotel in Goroka recently.

The meeting focused on a number of issues around the work of CARE in Obura Wonenara, in particular to support remote rural communities where there are high levels of poverty.

The footbridge project is part of CARE’s integrated community projects.
 The meeting was attended by senior officers from the district government and non-government sector including ATprojects, a locally based organization engaged to implement the project.

Co-director for ATprojects Steve Layton said: “We were primarily invited to talk about our current footbridge project and to also start looking at what an additional project could do in terms of more footbridges in 2015.”

He said there are six footbridge constructions taking place this year in identified remote rural sites in Obura Wonenara.

“Of these, the first phase in which the footing or base foundation of the low-suspension cable footbridge has been completed in Simbari and Simogu by our project engineer and support staff,” Layton said.

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By Joshua Arlo on Friday 28/02/2014

SIMBARI VILLAGE GETS NEW FOOTBRIDGE   Leave a comment

Mothers from Simbari crossing the old makeshift footbridge

Mothers from Simbari crossing the old makeshift footbridge

It was an ‘all hands-on’ affair as community members – men, women and even children – from Simbari Village began the long four-kilometre rugged trek from Simbari Station to the edge of Tarweka River carrying materials for their new footbridge. The thought of being able to cross a safe and secure bridge across the treacherous Tarweka River clearly outweighed the fact that 250 round trips were needed to transport all the materials for the footbridge on that same four-kilometre trek. The materials such as cement, sand and boards, and iron rails for supporting the base of the footbridge had been re-packed into smaller parcels to make carrying them easier. Sakina Alex, a mother who carried some supplies in her bilum on her back several times, said she was grateful the materials had been re-packaged in a way that it lessened the weight of lifting them to the construction site. “We are just happy that the bridge is being built here,” she said with a sunny smile. Simbari Station is located in the Yelia Local Level Government area of Obura-Wonenara Electorate, a very rural and remote electorate in the Eastern Highlands Province. Yelia has four wards with a total population of 10,000 people that are cut off by big rivers to access basic services like school, health and transport at the Simbari Station. The people also cross rivers and travel through Andakombi to reach Menyamya and then travel down into Lae to get store cargo and other necessities. The Tarweka River is one of the biggest challenges to accessing these basic services; it floods during rainy seasons and people cannot cross over to do business in Simbari or Andakombi. Jethro Isuwi, a villager, attributed the river to taking lives of many people while they were crossing it during the wet seasons. “We have lost coffee bags, food items and even pigs and dogs were swept away by the river,” he said. He said for him and his community, there had been no problem with providing the land for the footbridge, and for them assisting with big tasks like collection of sand, stones and carrying materials to the construction site. “I am here working with the rest of my community because we are thinking about our lives. Many times this river has taken lives when there are flash floods and people are crossing on the makeshift bridges. They are not secure. We build them too near the water’s top when it is flowing on a normal day. My children, my brothers, my sisters…we are all thinking of our lives, and that’s why we are working. I am happy that this footbridge is going to be built here,” he said. His sentiments are echoed all around with vigorous head nods from his fellow villagers. The footbridge is one of six new low-suspension wire footbridges that will be built in the electorate at six identified sites. It will be a span of 76 metres in length and is expected to be completed within an estimated period of 42 days. The footbridge construction taking place follows the ward development plans that were drawn up with the assistance from CARE International (Goroka) with the task of site study, design and evaluation work for the possibility of erecting footbridges in the Obura and Yelia LLGs contracted to ATprojects Inc., a local technical NGO based in Goroka. Work began in January this year following a contract signing in early December between CARE and ATprojects, with onsite ATprojects engineer Nagasi Namui assisted by other ATprojects support staff. ATprojects Co-Director Steve Layton said: “The project has been in the making for some time now, but has finally received the support of both the provincial and district governments. The footbridges will provide much needed safe access to a number of government services, as well as providing access to markets for both food and cash crops. Director Peter Raynes said CARE’s basic goal for its work in PNG is to particularly support remote rural communities where there are high levels of poverty, with particular interest in empowering women and girls to achieve gender equality and reduce poverty and social injustice. He said some of the work that CARE does around the province is in Obura-Wonenara District, one of the remote district, through an integrated community project that centres around supporting remote rural development committees to develop their plans for their areas and to work with their local level governments to consolidate those plans to ensure they are effected into district plans for improving health and education and livelihoods. CARE’s vision of women’s empowerment is necessary as it is an effective way to reduce poverty for the whole community – including men and boys. A similar footbridge was constructed in Andakombi and officially opened by Eastern Highlands Governor Julie Soso, who has pledged her provincial government’s support for this kind of development projects to assist rural areas and people in the province. The Simbari footbridge along with the Simogu footbridge were officially opened by Prime Minister Peter O’Neill in June this year.

By JOSHUA ARLO

BATTLING BAD ROADS TO BRING IN FOOTBRIDGE PROJECT   Leave a comment

The road was being upgraded during the trip but with the rain coming later on caused our vehicle to slip and get bogged

The road was being upgraded during the trip but with the rain coming later on caused our vehicle to slip and get bogged

One of the projects ATprojects is working on at the moment is the construction of 6 wire suspension footbridges in some of the remotest area of Papua New Guinea.

Some of the sites we have to travel into are by air so you can imagine how tough it is to carry the materials needed for these footbridges from the airstrip to the construction site.

Some of the sites are accessible by road, and it is a constant challenge to travel in with construction materials.

ATprojects truck carrying footbridge construction materials getting stuck after a 'light' shower

ATprojects truck carrying footbridge construction materials getting stuck after a ‘light’ shower

The pictures here show one such road trip earlier this year to Motakara, just near Obura station. ATprojects project engineer Nagasi Namui who travelled with CARE PNG staff on the ATprojects vehicles are seen being bogged down on the road to Motakara.

Several road bridges, built so many years ago and needing maintenance, did cause us to stop for a bit so we could negotiate a safe crossing. You can see us (pictured below) taking it slow over old road bridges that have planks missing – a common sight in many of our rural roads in the country.

"Okay, it's safe now to cross!"

“Okay, it’s safe now to cross!”

Despite this, the footbridge project in Motakara went ahead after we delivered the construction materials. The local community was so happy to see us. And the next day, didn’t wait to help carry the materials from the roadside to the construction site of the Motakara footbridge, funded and supported by CARE PNG and the Eastern Highlands Provincial government and Obura Wonenara district.

GOVERNOR HAPPY WITH FOOTBRIDGES IN EHP   Leave a comment

PM O'Neil & EHP Gov Soso opening Simbari footbridge

Prime Minister Peter O’Neil and EHP Governor Julie Soso looking at billboards of the completed Simbari footbridge before officially opening the footbridge on June 13th, 2014.

by JOSHUA ARLO

Eastern Highlands Governor Julie Soso is happy with the footbridge projects being carried out in the Obura Wonenara district.

“My provincial government put up K500, 000 as counter funding to this important and vital project,” Ms Soso said.

She said since coming into office as Governor, the focus had been mainly on infrastructure development and also empowerment of women in the province, among other agendas for the province.

“I commend Obura Wonenara MP Mehhra Kipefa for his commitment as an MP to support small scale infrastructure development projects like this in the district to benefit our people.

“I also commend CARE PNG for assisting the district in their ward plans to identify priority areas such as the footbridge projects that will link up the rural people to other services such as health, education and economic benefits,” Ms Soso said.

The footbridge projects are being constructed by ATprojects, a locally based organisation that is an expert in community development projects in rural areas in the province and also in other provinces. The footbridge projects are among community oriented projects that ATprojects is involved in.

ATprojects was engaged by CARE PNG to build these wire-cable footbridges in seven sites in the district, most of which are located near the Lamari River.

“Last year I opened the first footbridge at Andakombi, and on June 13th this year, we were privileged to have the Prime Minister Peter O’Neill officiate the opening of two more completed footbridges in the Simogu and Simbari areas, although the opening was made to coincide with the opening of the Marawaka Mini-Hydro station in Marawaka,” Ms Soso said.

At that opening, Prime Minister O’Neill credited current achievements in Obura Wonenara to the district and provincial administration and community development partners such as CARE PNG for assisting his government to bring about these positive changes.

O’Neill had stated then that his government’s current focus on supporting and ensuring more development projects like the footbridge projects going into rural areas, complement government policies such as free education and free health care to benefit the lives and livelihoods of the people in remote rural areas.

After that opening of the footbridges in June, then CARE PNG director Peter Raynes, who acknowledged the working partnership with ATprojects, officially handed over the footbridges to the people of Marawaka with the Prime Minister, Ms Soso and Mr Kipefa signing the release papers.

ATprojects engineer Nagasi Namui, who is leading the footbridge constructions, says work on all the footbridges is almost within completion by the end of November.

“We will be working on the second phase of the footbridge construction at Owena, which is past Obura station. Owena is accessible by plane so all materials needed to complete this footbridge will be flown in,” he said.

ATprojects co-director Steve Layton said materials are being packed today and will be brought down by road from Goroka to Aiyura where they will be flown in from the Summer Institute Linguistics (SIL) aviation base.

“Once Owena is completed, we will have built seven footbridges. These are Andakombi, Simbari, Simogu, Motokara, Sowara, Atatkara which was completed last month, and now Owena,” Mr Layton said.

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